Goode on Commercial Law GBV

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Foreword xvii,Preface xix,Preface to the Third Edition xxi. Preface to the Second Edition xxv,Foreword to the First Edition xxix. Preface to the First Edition xxxi,Acknowledgements xxxiv. List of Figures xxxv,Table of Statutes xxxvii,Table of Statutory Instruments li. Table of Codes lv,Table of EC Treaties and Legislation lvii.
Table of Conventions and Model Laws lix, Table of Uniform Rules Uniform Trade Terms and Restatements lxiii. Table of Cases lxv,PART ONE THE FOUNDATIONS OF COMMERCIAL LAW. 1 The Nature and Sources of Commercial Law 3,1 The law merchant 3. 2 The founding of English commercial law 6,3 The nature of commercial law 8. 4 The interests to be protected 10,5 The principal sources of commercial law 11.
6 The limitations of judicial precedent 21,7 The problem of language 22. 8 The economic analysis of law 24,2 Basic Concepts of Personal Property 27. 1 Classification of rights 28,2 Property and obligation 30. 3 Personal property defined 32, 4 The distinguishing characteristics of personal property 33. 5 Legal ownership 34,6 Equitable ownership 42,7 Possession 45.
8 Dealings in goods 49,9 Dealings in intangibles 51. viii Contents, 10 Essential elements for the consensual transfer of real rights 54. 11 Conflicting claims to pure personalty 55,12 The effect of transfers by a non owner 60. 13 Identifying the object of a transfer obligation 63. 14 The protection of property rights through the law of torts 66. 3 Some Aspects of Contract Law 69,1 The nature and function of contract law 69. 2 Contract tort and restitution 71,3 Promise and bargain 72.
4 Contract as a reflection of the will of the parties 78. 5 Formation and avoidance 79, 6 The classification of statements made in a contractual. setting 87,7 Ascertaining the contract terms 90,8 Construing the contract 98. 9 Restrictions on what can be validly stipulated 103. 10 The privity rule and its consequences 113,11 Variation and novation 116. 12 Waiver and estoppel 117,13 Remedies for misrepresentation 119. 14 Performance of the contract 122,15 Remedies for breach of contract 123.
16 Defences to a contract claim 143,17 Illegality 143. 18 Impediments to performance and the doctrine of frustration 149. 4 Commercial Contracts 155,1 Commercial and non commercial contracts 155. 2 Contract types and structures 156,3 Factors influencing the choice 162. 4 Market contracts and their organization 167,5 The legal power of the market 174. 5 Agency in Commercial Transactions 177,1 The concept of agency 179.
2 Sources of agency law 180,3 Types of agent 181,4 Authority and power of an agent 182. 5 Actual apparent and usual authority 183, 6 Conditions needed to be able to invoke apparent authority 185. 7 Ratification of acts done without authority 186,8 Relations between principal and agent 186. 9 Position of third party agency disclosed 191,10 Position of third party agency undisclosed 192. 11 Termination of the agent s authority 193,12 Dispositions by and to A 195.
Contents ix,PART TWO DOMESTIC SALES,6 A Brief History of Sales Law 199. 7 The Contract of Sale Its Nature and Function 207. 1 Ambit of the Sale of Goods Act 207,2 The language of the Sale of Goods Act 210. 3 The contract of sale defined 211, 4 The significance of the statutory definition 221. 5 Documentary and non documentary sales 223,6 Consumer sales 224. 8 The Passing of the Property 227,1 Identification of the contract goods 227.
2 Property some general aspects 235,3 Claims to goods forming part of a bulk 240. 4 The time when property passes to the buyer 250,9 Risk and Frustration 265. 1 The meaning of risk 265, 2 The general principle of risk res perit domino 267. 3 Wholly unascertained goods 268,4 Quasi specific goods 269. 5 Identified goods 271, 6 Goods supplied on approval or on sale or return 281.
7 Insurance 282,8 The Sale of Goods Act rules on frustration 283. 9 Effect of frustration at common law 286,10 Delivery 287. 1 The concept of delivery 287, 2 The relationship between implied terms and the delivery. obligation 288,3 Modes of delivery 289,4 The delivery point 294. 5 Time of delivery 294,6 Expenses of delivery 295,7 Excuses for non delivery 295.
8 The buyer s duties 296,9 Instalment deliveries 296. 10 Remedies for non delivery 303, 11 The Statutory Implied Terms in Favour of the Buyer 305. 1 Conditions and warranties 305, 2 Title freedom from encumbrances and quiet possession 309. 3 Correspondence with description 317,4 Quality 325. 5 Fitness for purpose 343,x Contents,6 Correspondence with sample 352.
7 The exclusion of liability for fitness quality and. correspondence with description or sample 354,8 Should further terms be implied 361. 9 The effect of replacement or repair of defective goods 363. 12 Rejection and its Consequences 367,1 The right to reject 367. 2 Time of rejection 368,3 Mode of rejection 368,4 Effectiveness of notice to reject 369. 5 Loss of right to reject 369,6 The effect of improper rejection 370. 7 The effect of lawful rejection 370,8 The right to cure 372.
13 Acceptance 375,1 The meaning of acceptance 375, 2 Acceptance as non rejection of an imperfect tender 375. 3 An outline of changes to the rules on acceptance 376. 4 What constitutes acceptance 377,5 The effect of acceptance 387. 14 The Buyer s Remedies for Misrepresentation or Breach by. the Seller 391,1 The remedies in outline 391,2 Anticipatory breach 396. 3 Non delivery 397,4 Delay in delivery 405,5 Tender of nonconforming goods 408. 6 Defect in seller s title 409,7 Damages for breach of warranty 409.
8 Available market 413,9 The relevance of subcontracts by the buyer 416. 10 A critique of the market price rale 418,11 Additional remedies of the consumer buyer 421. 15 Duties of the Buyer and Remedies of the Seller for. Misrepresentation or Breach 423,1 Duties of the buyer 423. 2 The seller s remedies in outline 423,3 Taking of delivery 424. 4 Acceptance 425,5 Payment 425,6 Rescission of the contract 428.
7 Anticipatory breach 429,8 Refusal to take delivery 433. 9 Non acceptance 434,Contents xi,10 Delay in taking delivery 441. 11 Remedies for non payment 441, 16 Title Conflicts between Seller or Buyer and Third Parties 449. 1 The competing claims for protection 450, 2 The nemo dat rule and its common law exceptions 451. 3 Statutory exceptions to the nemo dat rale 458,4 Conflicts as to proceeds 479.
5 Remedies in a conflict situation 479,6 Proposals for reform 481. PART THREE MONEY PAYMENT AND PAYMENT SYSTEMS,17 Concepts of Money and Payment 485. 1 Money 486,2 Intangible money 488,3 Payment 497,4 Payment systems 501. 5 Legal effects of interbank credit transfers 506, 6 Completion of payment of an in house credit transfer 509. 7 Contract netting netting by novation 509,8 Settlement 510.
18 Instruments Generally 513,1 What is an instrument 513. 2 Classes of instrument 514,3 Historical background 515. 4 The autonomy of the payment obligation 517,5 Certainty and unconditionality 518. 6 The negotiable instrument as an abstract payment. undertaking 518,7 Decline in the importance of instruments 519. 19 Bills of Exchange 521,1 The statutory definition 521.
2 Issue and acceptance 523,3 Transfer 527,4 The holder 530. 5 Accommodation parties and accommodation bills 537. 6 Liabilities of parties 538,7 Prerequisites of enforcement 547. 8 Remedies for dishonour 551,9 Defences to a claim on a bill 552. 10 Discharge 563,11 Effect of bill on underlying contract 565. 12 Security over bills 565,13 Advantages of a bill 566.
xii Contents, 20 Cheques and the Duties of Bankers in Relation Thereto 569. 1 Definitions and distinguishing characteristics 569. 2 Form of a cheque 570,3 Crossings 571,4 The cheque clearing system 574. 5 When is a cheque deemed to have been paid 575,6 The banker customer relationship 578. 7 The collecting bank 581,8 The paying bank 594,21 Other Instruments 607. 1 Promissory notes 607,2 Bankers drafts 608,3 Travellers cheques 609.
4 Negotiable instruments as investment securities 611. PART FOUR SECURED FINANCING, 22 The Classification and Characteristics of Credit and. Security 619,1 The nature and forms of credit 620, 2 The secured creditor versus the unsecured creditor 624. 3 Consensual security 626,4 Legal security 660,5 The incidents of real security 664. 6 Attachment perfection and priorities 665,7 The transfer of security rights 665. 23 The Creation Enforcement and Transfer of Security Rights 667. 1 The grant of security contract and conveyance 667. 2 The ingredients of attachment 670,3 Effect of attachment 676.
4 Enforcement of the security 680,5 Transfer of the security 684. 6 Assignment of security without debt and vice versa 688. 24 Principles of Perfection and Priorities 689,1 The need to perfect 689. 2 Methods of perfection 689,3 Priorities some general points 697. 4 Registration requirements and their impact on priorities 701. 5 The after acquired property clause and the purchase money. security interest 713,6 Circularity problems 715, 7 General conclusions on perfection and priorities under. English law 718,Contents xiii,25 The Floating Charge 721.
1 Evolution of the charge 721,2 The nature of the charge 722. 3 Creation of the charge 726,4 Crystallization of the charge 728. 5 Effect of crystallization as between chargor and chargee 732. 6 Effect of crystallization as between chargee and third. parties 732,7 Priorities 733,8 The future of the floating charge 736. PART FIVE SPECIFIC FORMS OF SECURED BUSINESS FINANCE. 26 General Financing Considerations 741,1 Selecting the security instrument 741. 2 The assets cycle 746,3 Types of finance required 749.
4 The functional classification of collateral 750,27 Conditional Sale and Hire Purchase 751. 1 The financing technique 751,2 Conditional sale 755. 3 Hire purchase 757,4 Relations between finance house and dealer 763. 5 Relations between dealer and buyer or hirer in direct. collection transactions 764,6 Tracing proceeds of authorized resales 765. 28 The Finance Lease 767,1 The nature of the finance lease 767.
2 Reasons for use 768,3 Setting up the transaction 769. 4 The triangular relationship 771, 5 The rights and duties of lessor and lessee inter se 773. 6 The lessor and the supplier 774,7 More developed structures 775. 8 The lessor and third parties 778,29 Financing against Stock and Receivables 781. 1 Stocking finance 782,2 Receivables financing 787.
30 Guarantees 877,1 The legal nature of a guarantee 878. 2 Types of guarantee 882,3 Unilateral nature of the contract 889. 4 Relations between creditor and guarantor 889,5 Rights of the guarantor against the debtor 893. xiv Contents,6 Discharge of the guarantor 896,7 Contribution between guarantors 899. PART SIX CORPORATE INSOLVENCY,31 Principles of Corporate Insolvency Law 903.
1 Historical background 903,2 Winding up distinguished from bankruptcy 905. 3 The regimes of corporate insolvency 906,4 The objectives of corporate insolvency law 906. 5 The cardinal principles of corporate insolvency law 907. 6 Subsidiary principles 912,7 The winding up process 912. 8 Proof and ranking of claims in winding up 913,9 Vulnerable transactions 915. 10 Administrative receivership 920,11 Administration 927.
12 Liability of directors for improper trading 932. 13 Cross border insolvencies 934,PART SEVEN INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND FINANCE. 32 The Characteristics and Organization of International Sales. Transactions 941,1 Characteristics 941,2 Trends in export procedures 942. 3 Problems peculiar to export sales 942,4 The Single European Market 943. 5 Sources of law 944, 6 The delivery point on sale to an overseas buyer 944. 7 A typical export transaction 952,8 Documents in export sales 959.
9 Breach of duty to tender documents 1013, 33 The Vienna Convention on International Sales 1015. 1 Sphere of application of CISG 1018,2 Formation of the contract 1025. 3 Rights and duties of the parties 1026,34 Documentary Sales 1033. 1 Strict f o b 1033,2 Extended f o b 1041,3 C i f 1042. 35 The Financing of International Trade 1053,1 Payment arrangements generally 1053.
2 The documentary bill 1054,Contents xv,3 The documentary credit nature mechanism and. relationships 1055, 4 Documentary credits grounds for withholding or blocking. payment 1098,5 The transfer of a credit and its proceeds 1110. 6 Back to back credits 1119, 7 Raising of funds by seller against drafts or credits 1120. 8 Raising of finance by buyer on security of imported goods 1122. 9 Demand guarantees performance bonds and standby,credits 1124.
36 Rights and Duties of the Sea Carrier 1143,1 Sources of law 1144. 2 Application of the Hague Visby Rules 1147,3 The parties to the contract of carriage 1149. 4 Formation and evidence of the contract 1152, 5 Duties and liabilities of the carrier under or by virtue of. the contract of carriage 1153, 6 Evidence and burden of proof in contractual claims agai. 4 Commercial Contracts 155 1 Commercial and non commercial contracts 155 2 Contract types and structures 156 3 Factors influencing the choice 162 4 Market contracts and their organization 167 5 The legal power of the market 174 5 Agency in Commercial Transactions 177 1 The concept of agency 179 2 Sources of agency law 180 3 Types of

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