Basis for Landfill Classification System

Basis For Landfill Classification System-PDF Download

  • Date:29 Jul 2020
  • Views:0
  • Downloads:0
  • Pages:128
  • Size:1.12 MB

Share Pdf : Basis For Landfill Classification System

Download and Preview : Basis For Landfill Classification System


Report CopyRight/DMCA Form For : Basis For Landfill Classification System


Transcription:

Executive Summary ES 1,1 Introduction 1 1,1 1 Background 1 1. 1 2 Purpose of this Report 1 1,1 3 Assumptions 1 2. 1 4 Report Layout 1 2, 2 Issues Associated with Landfill Classification 2 4. 2 1 Landfill Classification Systems 2 4,2 2 Types of Classification System 2 4. 2 2 1 Prescriptive 2 4,2 2 2 Performance Based 2 5.
2 2 3 Effects Risk Based 2 7,2 2 4 Combinations of Different Systems 2 9. 2 3 Technical Considerations 2 9, 2 3 1 Contaminant Transport in Sub surface Materials 2 9. 2 3 2 Containment Using Engineered Liners 2 12,2 3 3 Contaminant Transport in Surface Water 2 16. 2 3 4 Contaminant Transport Via Air Discharges 2 17. 2 4 Modeling of Landfill Examples 2 20,2 4 1 Contaminants 2 21. 2 4 2 Leachate Head 2 21,2 4 3 Landfill Liners 2 23.
2 4 4 Underlying Geology 2 25,2 4 5 Compliance Point 2 26. 2 4 6 Leachate Leakage Through Liners 2 26, 2 4 7 Contaminant Concentrations at Compliance Points 2 27. 2 5 Relative Importance to Classification of Landfill Siting Design and Operations 2 31. 2 5 1 Siting 2 31,2 5 2 Design 2 32,2 5 3 Operations 2 33. 2 5 4 Assessment of Landfill Siting Design and Operational Factors 2 34. 2 6 CAE Landfill Guidelines 2000 2 36, 3 Review of Classification Systems and Methodologies 3 1. 3 1 International Landfill Classifications 3 1,3 1 1 UNEP General Landfill Categories 3 1.
3 1 2 ISWA International Guidelines for Landfill Evaluation 3 2. 3 2 New Zealand Landfill Classifications 3 5, 3 2 1 Health and Environmental Guidelines for Selected Timber Treatment. 3 2 2 Effects Based Landfill Classification for Hydrocarbon Contaminated. Waste Disposal 3 7, 3 3 Landfill Classifications in Selected Countries 3 9. 3 3 1 Landfill Classifications 3 9,S JOBS 48218 003 R001 F DOC 13 NOV 01. 4 Assessment of Classification Systems 4 1,4 1 Assessment of Classification Systems 4 1. 4 1 1 Prescriptive 4 1,4 1 2 Performance Based 4 3.
4 1 3 Effects or Risk Based 4 6,4 1 4 Combination Classification System 4 8. 4 1 5 Tiered Classification Methodology 4 9,5 Recommended Classification Methodology 5 1. 5 1 Recommended Classification Methodology 5 1,5 2 Classification Process 5 3. 5 2 1 Mechanisms for Implementation 5 3, 5 2 2 Classification Criteria and Assessment Procedure 5 3. 5 2 3 Relationship Between Landfill Classification and Landfill Standards 5 5. 5 2 4 Implementation of Assessment Procedure 5 5,5 2 5 Classification Assessor 5 6.
5 2 6 Potential Classification Authorities 5 7, 5 2 7 MfE Landfill Intervention Under the Landfill Management. Programme 5 8,Acknowledgements,Bibliography,S JOBS 48218 003 R001 F DOC 13 NOV 01. List of Tables Figures Appendices, Table 2 1 USEPA Maximum Concentration Limits MCLs 2 8. Table 2 2 Typical Constituents Found in Landfill Gas 2 18. Table 2 3 Hydrogeological Properties of Underlying Geology 2 25. Table 2 4 Leachate Leakage from Liners 2 27, Table 2 5 Contaminant Concentrations for Nickel in Groundwater 2 28. Table 2 6 Contaminant Concentrations for Vinyl Chloride in Groundwater 2 29. Table 2 7 Assessment of Landfill Siting Design and Operational Factors 2 35. Table 3 1 Features of UNEP Landfill Categories 3 11. Table 3 2 ISWA International Guidelines for Landfill Evaluation 3 3. Table 3 3 Landfill Classification Criteria for Disposal of Selected Timber Treatment Chemicals 3 6. Table 3 4 Landfill Classification Criteria for Disposal of Hydrocarbon Contaminated Waste 3 8. Table 3 5 Summary of Overseas Classification Systems 3 11. Table 4 1 Assessment of Landfill Classification Systems 4 10. Figure 2 1 Landfill Classification Systems 2 6,Figure 2 2 Model Landfill 2 22.
Figure 2 3 Modeled Landfill Liners 2 24, Figure 5 1 Landfill Classification Methodology 5 2. Appendices,Appendix A Project Brief, Appendix B Processes Controlling Sub surface Contaminant Transport. Appendix C CAE Landfill Guidelines,Appendix D Overseas Landfill Classifications. S JOBS 48218 003 R001 F DOC 13 NOV 01,Executive Summary. Introduction, This report has been prepared by URS New Zealand to provide the basis for the development of a.
nationally consistent landfill classification methodology It is intended to provide technical background. information and discuss implementation options for the Ministry for the Environment s MfE preferred. option for the landfilling of wastes with hazardous properties. The MfE preferred option involves a distinction between two classes of landfill Class A and Class B. based on degree of environmental protection Each class of landfill would have a different prescriptive. list of waste acceptance criteria WAC with the Class B landfill WAC more stringent than that for Class. A landfills WAC may be a combination of concentration and mass thresholds and leachability criteria. Actual classification criteria for the different landfill classes A and B and specific waste acceptance. criteria for the different classes of landfill are not determined at this stage but a recommendation on a. preferred classification methodology is made, The classification methodology is not intended to be used to set standards for landfill siting design or. operations but rather to define those landfills with the appropriate level of environmental protection. through siting design and operational characteristics for the different waste acceptance criteria. Issues Associated With Landfill Classification, There are essentially three general types of landfill classification system. prescriptive,performance and,effects risk based, A prescriptive landfill classification system sets out requirements for siting design and operations that. must be met These are generally set at a level to ensure that adverse environmental effects will be. avoided in the majority of situations, A performance based landfill classification system sets out criteria that must be met with respect to. performance of the landfill at a specified compliance point or points. An effects risk based landfill classification system sets out criteria with respect to the receiving. environment that must not be exceeded, In practice classification systems are not exclusively prescriptive performance or effects risk based but.
can use a combination of requirements and criteria. The following technical issues relevant to consideration of landfill classification systems are discussed. contaminant transport in sub surface materials,containment using engineered liner systems. S JOBS 48218 003 R001 F DOC 13 NOV 01,Executive Summary. contaminant transport in surface water,contaminant transport via air discharges. A number of different engineered liner systems and underlying geologies were modeled in order to. compare differences between various site and engineered liner systems a number of landfill scenarios. were modeled, The results indicate the differences in contaminant concentrations at a downgradient compliance point for. different leachate heads liners and site geologies They demonstrate the importance of a landfill site s. underlying geology to the long term containment of contaminants In addition the design of the landfill. liner and an effective leachate collection system can significantly reduce potential leakage at least in the. short term, Siting design and operational factors all need to be considered in developing a classification system.
These factors were ascribed a ranking which relates to the degree of certainty they afford in respect of. long term environmental protection, Of all the factors geology and hydrogeology were given the highest ranking as they provide the basis for. long term leachate containment and cannot be altered once a landfill is constructed This indicates that. siting is fundamental to any landfill classification system Some designed components can be altered. retrofitted or upgraded at existing landfills and all can be altered or upgraded for lateral expansions of an. existing landfill Operational factors were given the lowest ranking as they can change or be upgraded. at any landfill to improve environmental outcomes, Review of Classification Systems and Methodologies. Existing international and New Zealand landfill classification systems were outlined. There have recently been two classification systems published by international environmental. organisations to provide general categories into which landfills can be classified in respect of the degree. of environmental protection they offer They are,UNEP General Landfill Categories and. ISWA International Guidelines for Landfill Evaluation. Two different landfill classifications have been developed in New Zealand to assist in the setting of. landfill waste acceptance criteria for specific waste types These are. Health and Environmental Guidelines for Selected Timber Treatment Sites which contains a landfill. classification and, Effects Based Landfill Classification for Hydrocarbon Contaminated Waste Disposal. Landfill classifications and criteria from the following countries were reviewed and summarised. South Africa,S JOBS 48218 003 R001 F DOC 13 NOV 01.
Executive Summary,Australia New South Wales,United States of America. These classifications are associated with standards for landfill development In general all provide for a. class of landfill accepting municipal solid waste MSW and another class with more stringent. requirements for hazardous or industrial wastes, Waste acceptance criteria for the different classes of landfill are either prescribed or calculated by a set. Assessment of Classification Systems, The different classification systems prescriptive performance and effects risk based were assessed and. the advantages and disadvantages of each outlined, A classification system using a combination of prescriptive performance and effects risk based criteria. for different elements was discussed, A classification methodology that would use prescriptive performance based and effects risk based.
classification systems progressively in a tiered manner was also discussed. Recommended Classification Methodology, A tiered methodology is recommended for classifying landfills in New Zealand. This methodology would use prescriptive performance based and effects risk based classification. systems progressively in a tiered manner Prescriptive requirements would be used to filter out those. elements of siting design and operations that require further analysis using performance and effects risk. based criteria to determine their classification, The methodology would require the development of appropriate prescriptive performance based and. effects risk based New Zealand criteria for siting design and operations for Class A landfills. There are a number of options for agencies or bodies that could carry out landfill classifications These. regional councils, Ministry for the Environment or central classification authority. accredited organisations or individuals,S JOBS 48218 003 R001 F DOC 13 NOV 01. Introduction SECTION 1,1 Introduction,1 1 Background.
The Ministry for the Environment MfE is currently considering options for the implementation of. nationally consistent landfill waste acceptance criteria LWAC to reduce the risk of releasing hazardous. constituents into the environment via landfill discharges. In its issues and options report Landfill Acceptance Criteria for Wastes with Hazardous Properties. dated April 2001 the Ministry for the Environment identified a preferred option for developing waste. acceptance criteria The preferred option Option B proposes the following. distinction between two classes of landfill Class A and Class B based on standards of. environmental protection with each class using a different prescriptive list to determine what wastes. are suitable for disposal, The MfE report refers to Class A landfills as being landfills that comply with site selection and design. recommendations outlined in the CAE Landfill Guidelines 2000 Class B landfills are described as. waste disposal facilities not meeting site selection and design recommendations outlined in the CAE. Landfill Guidelines 2000, The prescriptive lists that would comprise the waste acceptance criteria could be combinations of. concentration and mass thresholds and leachability criteria. 1 2 Purpose of this Report, This report has been prepared by URS New Zealand to provide the basis for the development of a. nationally consistent landfill classification methodology It is intended to. to provide technical background information and discuss implementation options for the Ministry for. the Environment s preferred option of a landfill classification system. outline the extent to which landfill design siting criteria and operational management procedures. should be considered during the development of a landfill classification system. recommend a classification methodology or methodologies that is robust transparent flexible to. allow for alternative designs and developments in technology and able to be implemented for. existing and proposed new landfills, Actual classification criteria for the different landfill classes A and B and specific waste acceptance. criteria for the different classes of landfill are not determined at this stage but a recommendation is made. as to a preferred classification methodology, A copy of the project brief is attached as Appendix A.
S JOBS 48218 003 R001 F DOC 13 NOV 01,Introduction SECTION 1. Basis for Landfill Classification System Prepared for Ministry for the Environment P O Box 10 362 WELLINGTON 13 November 2001 R001 F DOC Contents S JOBS48218 03R001 F DOC13 NOV 01 i Executive Summary ES 1 1 Introduction 1 1 1 1 Background 1 1 1 2 Purpose of this Report 1 1 1 3 Assumptions 1 2 1 4 Report Layout 1 2 2 Issues Associated with Landfill Classification 2 4 2 1

Related Books